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سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين

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11-18-2003, 08:51 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين

    طلب مني الاستاذ عجب الفيا شيئا عن حمزة علاء الدين
    الرجل من اعظم عازفي العود ,, ومن اعظم موسيقيي النوبة ,, ربما لا يعرفه الجيل الجديد ,, هو محل نزاع مصري سوداني ,, يقول المصريون انه الفنان المصري النوبي العالمي حمزة علاء الدين لانهم يعرفون حجمه العالمي ويهمله اهله السودانيون لاننا نضيق بصقل الجواهر وتلمعيها ,, استعمت اليه حيا امامي في بداية الثمانينات ,, كان يجلس على نجيل خرطومي اخطر ,, وتحت سماء خرطومية دافئة ,, ومن بين اصابعه يكاد العود ينطق بكلام من بعيد ,, من زمن غابر ,, من مكان لا اعرفه بين عبري واسوان ,,
    هو من جيل الصلحي ,, وعثمان وقيع الله ,, هؤلاء ايضا فنانون مارسوا فنا سودانيا خالصا في بلاد بعيدة .
    حمزة علاء الدين جال بين الولايات المتحدة واليابان
    في سيرته الذاتية التي نشرها في موقعهhttp://www.hamzaeldin.com قال انه ولد في توشكى في مصر : وفي موسوعة الموسقيين ولد في وادي حلفا ,, هنا حديثه في موقعه وتجد في نهاية هذا الكلام مقال موسوعة المشرق
    HAMZA ALDIN
    Performing on the oud (the Arabian short-necked lute) and the tar (the ancient single-skinned frame drum of the upper Nile), along with his gentle voice and original compositions, Hamza combines the subtleties of Arabic music with the indigenous music of his native Nubia. He has single-handedly forged a new music, essentially a Nubian/ Arabic fusion but one in line with both traditions and informed by Western conservatory training. His music has captured the interest of listeners worldwide.
    First discovered by Western audiences through his performance at the Newport Folk Festival, the U.N. Human Rights Day and Vanguard recordings in 1964, his 1971 Nonesuch recording, Escalay: The Water Wheel is legendary among musicians and connoisseurs. The Escalay album, 1971 Nonesuch recording, was re-released in 1998. His best known recording in the U.S. is Eclipse, produced and engineered by Grateful Dead percussionist Mickey Hart. Hamza's music has also appeared in movies soundtracks including the Black Stallion, You Are What You Eat and, The Passion in the Desert. Hamza has appeared regularly with the Kronos Quartet, which included Escalay: the Water Wheel on their chart-topping Pieces of Africa album (Elektra/ Nonesuch, 1992). From 1995 to 1997, Hamza toured most of the world. Hamza's 1996 album, Available Sound: Darius debuted from Lotus Records (Salzburg, Austria) and was nominated for the European equivalent of the Grammy, the Preis der Deutschen Schallplatten Kritik. A new CD A Wish by Sounds True was released in May 1999. Hamza's compositions were performed by many ballet companies such as Maurice Bejart Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Molissa Fenley Dance Company and Lines Contemporary Ballet in San Francisco.

    BIOGRAPHY

    Hamza El Din is considered the father of modern Nubian music. He was born in Toshka, Nubia, Egypt. Hamza studied at King Fouad University (now the University of Cairo), then enrolled in the Popular University and at Ibrahim Shafiq's Institute of Music (Shafiq was renowned as a master of Arabian music and of the Muwashshah rhyme forms). Following graduation, he continued his studies at the King Fouad Institute for Middle Eastern Music, mastering the oud. Later, with an Italian government grant, he studied Western music and classical guitar at the Academy of Santa Cecilia in Rome.

    Next he emigrated to the U.S., where he lived and worked as a recording and concert artist, and taught as an ethnomusicologist in several American universities, including the University of Ohio (Athens), the University of Washington (Seattle) and the University of Texas (Austin). Aided by a grant from the Japan Foundation, he went to Tokyo to make a comparative study between the Arabian oud and the Japanese biwa during the 1980's. Today He resides in the San Francisco Bay area, and continues composing, teaching, recording and keeping a busy worldwide concert schedule. Hamza El Din composed music for the Kronos Quartet and for the play "The Persians" (directed by Peter Sellars). In recent years, he performed at major festivals including Edinburgh, Salzburg, Vienna, Paris, Berlin, Montreux, Barcelona, Los Angeles, Monterey and Festival Cervantino (Guanajuato, Mexico).

    Hamza El Din, who has made his life's work reinterpreting the songs of his native region of Nubia on the oud, performed intense music with extreme quietude at Symphony Space on Saturday night... Ben Ratliff The New York Times, Reviews, March 2, 1999

    Music doesn't get much starker than the songs of Hamza El Din, the Nubian musician who performed Saturday night at the Triplex Theater .... He is a virtuoso, but one who uses his technique toward clarity rather than display. Jon Pareles The New York Times, Reviews, April 19, 1989

    (Hamza) began to evolve new musical forms by drawing the moods and colors of Nubian music into the vast technical and aesthetic structure of Arabic classical music. The result is not a loose amalgamation of tow variant forms of music but an entirely new mode of expression. What is especially significant is his full command of the technical possibilities of the Oud combined with new musical patterns and ideas, growing out of the vocal music and drumming of traditional Nubia. Elizabeth Fernea, Liner notes of Escalay: the Water Wheel, Nonesuch 1998

    El Din establishes a skittering rhythm and a melody alternately intoned by oud or voice. The melodies come and go with microtones and scales... SF Weekly, Music Reviews, February 18-24,1998.

    Hamza El Din is a world music giant, an international emissary of Nubian music and culture and an artistic pioneer in the recording of world music. Rhythm Music Magazine, October 1997.

    His playing, rich in overtones, is more relaxed, subtle and intricate than that of the typical oud virtuoso. San Francisco Chronicle, July 7, 1996

    A warm cloud of silence seems to envelop the hall whenever this Nubian born Tokyo resident comes to town, A few impossibly elegant beats on his tar frame drum, some timeless notes plucked from an oud, or a couple of reedy vocal phrases, and you're off to a virtual Upper Nile desert. A more exquisite and less taxing holiday would be tough to conjure. Village Voice, (New York) March 8, 1994

    Hamza El Din is one of the greatest ambassadors for Nubian and Egyptian culture ... [his] sound is so rich that it is sometimes hard to believe that only one man is playing. Al Ahram, (Cairo) January 20-26, 1994.

    This was not some sort of exotic ethnic music, these were the songs and instrumental pieces of a great composer, steeped in the musical language of his Nubian heritage and gifted with the power to transform it into a shapely, sophisticated art form without destroying its own sense of place. LA Weekly, September 3-9, 1993.

    Bypass this rare solo performance only at risk of extreme cultural impoverishment. San Francisco Bay Guardian, February 5, 1992.

    In a harrowing beautiful 12-minutes piece called" Water Wheel" Sudanese born musician Hamza El Din creates a lament for his village, which was flooded, and its people forced to relocate, after the Aswan High Dam was built. Entertainment Weekly, February 28, 1992.

    ...El Din was renowned long before the new generation of hip young world music buffs "discovered" his haunting rhythm and surging lyrical instrumentals. Pacific Sun, February 7,1992.

    The Sudan has not figured prominently in the most faddish recent preoccupations with world music, but native son, Hamza El Din, has been an important influence in the reclamation and forward progression of indigenous Nubian traditions. In addition to mastering the TAR, he adopted the OUD and became virtuoso, playing in the both its traditional as an accompaniment to mesmerizing, chant like singing and as solo instrument. The SF Bay Guardian, Critic's Choice, January 2, 1992

    ...Hamza's soaring lyrics, sang in the ancient Nubian Language, and his droning 'Ud hauntingly evoke the spirit of his home land. Louis Werner, Aramco World, July-August, 1992.

    He sang and played in masterful form... The Japan Times, (Tokyo), November 13,1988.

    ==
    من موسوعة المشرق
    http://i-cias.com/e.o/hamzad.htm
    Hamza El Din

    (Wadi Halfa, Sudan 1929- Sudanese performing musician of Islamic Nubian and Arabic Music.
    Almost 4 decades elapsed since Hamza El Din started his sacred mission of promoting, developing and presenting the Nubian Culture to the world. He was one of the many thousands suffering from the Nubian Diaspora following the loss of hometowns and villages after inundation by the waters of the Aswan High Dam.
    His sentiments are deeply expressed through his songs, where his longing is expressed by called Nubia as the daughter of mother earth.
    His name remains synonymous to Nubia, Nubian Music and culture. His long and cumbersome journey was accompanied by his oud (lute) and tar (the traditional Nubian instrument).
    His style is simple and majestically powerful. With a charismatic voice, and only few taps on the tar and some tender play on the oud by him is sufficient to make all Nubians hear themselves.
    Hamza was graduated as an electrical engineer over 4 decades back when electrical engineers were scarcity in his homeland Sudan and in Egypt where he got his degree. However, without any musical background he heart was drawn to Nubian music, and he learned the oud to a level of becoming one of the few living masters of this instrument. Hamza managed to reinvented Nubian music traditions.
    His Sufi background and teachings by his grandfather on Rumi and other famous Sufi mystics and poets has qualified him to become a master in this field as well.

    ان المزيد من الضوء مطلوب حول الرجل ,,
    مع تحياتي
                  

11-18-2003, 09:29 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    وفي فلكولور ماغازين كتب كن هنت شيئا عن حمزة علاء الدين
    Ken Hunt puts in a long-distance call to Nubian
    oud maestro Hamza El Din
    from Folkroots Magazine, November 1996
    Although it may sound ridiculous for someone who was brought up in a South London street jocularly known as Commonwealth Street, African music left no imprint on my youth. While the boom of West Indian basslines lulled me to sleep in the late 1950s, no memory of Nigerian or Ghanian music carried over into my adult life. It would take the folk revival and the second volume of the Newport Folk Festival 1964: Evening Concerts to introduce African music to my life. The first African music I can consciously recall was by Hamza El Din, the living ambassador of Nubian music, at the unattainable Newport Folk Festival. But by the time the oudist and vocalist was featuring on the bill of the Newport Folk Festival he already had a colourful life behind him and a still more colourful one stretching out before him.
    Hamza El Din's Nubian homeland, famed for its striking rock formations, achieved fame of a different sort when the engineering marvel of the Aswan Dam was completed in 1902. In 1912 it was extended to harness the Upper Nile more efficiently. On 10 July 1929 Hamza El Din was born at Wadi Halfa near the Egypt-Sudan border. Five years later more land was flooded by the newly extended Aswan Dam. His family moved before the building of the better-known Aswan High Dam. Small wonder therefore that water irrigates Hamza El Din's musical imagination. Small wonder that, for many years, his future seemed destined to lay in engineering, his father, Alaud'in's preference for a 'proper job'. Fortunately his grandfather, who raised him, introduced him to the poetry of Rumi too and probably would have been subversively delighted with his grandson's accompaniment of Coleman Barks' translations entitled Like This: More Poems of Rumi.
    Music played little part in his cultural background. His Islamic upbringing, he says, was "not really strict, not really orthodox, it was loose." Musicmaking was frowned upon, as in many societies. "It was the culture," he reinforces, "not the religion. It was the culture that was affecting us." When music hit him, it hit him hard. "When I was a young boy I came to Cairo and I was exposed to the whole of modern life then. Where I was born we didn't even have a bike. I discovered this little box down the stairs. Beneath our building there was a coffee shop. They had this little brown box with a yellow mouse making funny noises. That was the radio. For the first time I encountered one. I heard this sound. It was something I'd never heard before. That was the first time I heard music. I was about five or six, that first time I went to Egypt with my parents. After that I became familiar with Egyptian culture, musically speaking."
    Thirties' Cairo had the reputation of being one of the great musical cities and Egypt one of the great musical nations. It was an era in which a new generation of superstars emerged, musicians of the calibre of Mohamed Abdulwahab and Oum Kalthoum, musicians who would bestride Arab popular music for decades, their music exuding a potency beguiling far beyond Egypt's political borders. "At that time in Egypt," he quips, "between every coffee shop and the next coffee shop there was a coffee shop and each coffee shop had a radio. When you walked down the street you continuously heard music. Especially, say, if there was an Oum Kalthoum concert that night, the whole country would be playing it. You walked down the street and the same song would be going along with you. If you walked for half-an-hour you'd hear the same thing everywhere. You had to hear it."
    Music had entered his life. "When I was studying electrical engineering at the University of Cairo, there I discovered the student musical association. I was able to enter that room and feel and touch those instruments for the first time in my life. Because in my culture, music is unheard of. It is not Nubian. My parents would never allow it. That's how I was introduced to the oud." Several forms of the oud, an anglicization of the Arabic `d, a short-necked lute (lute is another corruption) exist. Hamza El Din's instrument has six courses of paired strings, traditionally plucked, most poetically, with an eagle's feather quill.
    The path from consumer to musician was paved with student politics. "I was studying engineering, right? And studying engineering, you would be aware of something like the Aswan High Dam. My people had been affected by another dam, a smaller one called the Aswan Dam before the High Dam. As is usual, people lost something psychologically. I was afraid my people would be affected by the Aswan High Dam which as going to take us completely away from the land we lived in since recorded history. You know, young people in the university they are always socially and politically active, right? I was one of those so I used music to activate social interest in my people."
    After graduating in 1948 he found work as an engineer on the Egyptian railway. A little later he began studying music at the Institute of Music in Cairo. "At the same time I was composing for my people," he recalls. "I don't have a musical background, neither do my people, so whatever I did, including tuning, was fun for them. We didn't have a musical background as such, so when I started my people liked anything I did including tuning!"
    Moving to Rome to continue his musical studies, he ran into an expatriate American. They became firm friends, so much so that Geno Foreman contemplated moving to Nubia. This plan was abandoned; the American had a new one. "When we finished school," Hamza recollects, "he suggested that I should come to the States to do my first recording before I went back home. He was friends with Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and so on. He gave them a small tape to introduce me to their record companies. Joan Baez took it to Vanguard and that's how I came here."

    Hamza El Din's relationship with Vanguard would result in two albums, Music of Nubia released in 1964 and Al Oud "a year later". However, for many their introduction to Hamza El Din's music was the anthology, Newport Folk Festival 1964: Evening Concerts. Asked how he clinched an appearance at Newport at such a relatively stage in his American career, he answers, "Well, God is great. I had come here in October '62 and I was in the middle of recording my music. I went with Geno to Boston. We visited a club. He took me there with my broken oud I came here with a broken oud. You see, I can't play for people who are drinking but I had to because of Geno. After I finished playing, a gentleman came to me and asked, `Would you like to play in the Newport Festival?' I didn't know what the Newport Festival was! I thought it was a club like the one I was in. I said, `Yes...if they're not drinking.'" He laughs long and loud at his naivety and boldness.
    "Around the time he was discussing this with me [1964], it was Human Rights Day in the United Nations in New York. I knew they used music in that celebration. I introduced myself and they tried to refuse me because they only played classical music. I asked, `What do you mean? Who said only western music is classical?' U Thant was the Secretary-General and it happened that I met him that day and complained to him that we could not celebrate Human Rights Day. He said, `Who said that?' I told him the gentleman running the office. He called him, introduced me, and I played the Human Rights Day. It was another success which pushed the Newport Folk Festival into accepting me without hesitation."

    Hamza El Din became a fixture within what he calls the "esoteric music circle". There was a great deal of interest in his non-western classical music, fed in part by the genuine interest in Indian classical music. For example, he recalls meeting the composer Terry Riley in California in 1968. Their encounter led to work as a teacher and course instructor. In the 1990s the Riley connection would lead to the Kronos Quartet recording a composition of his. The circle of like- minded individuals would expand.
    Although he had become known for his oud playing, even on his Vanguard debut - albeit on a single track, Nubala, with a bongo-bashing Sandy Bull - he also played the tar. The tar is Nubia's sweet-voiced, single-headed hoop drum, not be confused with Iran's stringed instrument of the same name. "Tar is widely used but was not my instrument until I started teaching music appreciation in Pennsylvania in 1966/67. The oud was my personal instrument," he clarifies, "even at home."
    For Hamza El Din a key composition, almost a signature tune, is Escalay which means `water wheel' in Nubian. Escalay became the title of his 1971 release for Nonesuch Explorer, an album which would include a cover of a piece by Mohamed Abdulwahab and a tar track. It would put him firmly on the map for many. (Nonesuch is set to reissue Escalay in 1997 although naturally their Japanese offshoot has already reissued it.)
    Mickey Hart, who recorded his Eclipse album in January 1978 and had him as a guest at several Grateful Dead concerts, most memorably at the Pyramids that September during a total eclipse, recalls his introduction as phonographical too. He too singles out Escalay. "That was my first contact with Hamza. Everybody heard those albums. That's what was going around. He was a favourite listening post. It was really unique. It was so soft. It was the first soft, gentle percussion that I'd run into. It was the first desert music. It captivated me. It was the first of that genre and his voice was so silky but it had a touch of sand in it as well. And, of course, he's a master of silence, of the spaces between the notes. Those records just sounded wonderful."
    Escalay, which had made its phonographic debut on Hamza's Nonesuch album, was reprised in a new context in 1992. It became the oldest and one of the finest compositions on the Kronos Quartet's 1992 album, Pieces of Africa. Escalay's central image is the water wheel. In Nubia this is no mere machine for extracting water. It is a metaphor for life itself. As the oxen trace the creaking wheel through its repetitive cycle, its relentless, mesmerizing rhythms release the machine's minder to daydream and set song and melody to rhythm. People entrain with its rhythms and, out of that communion, comes each individual's song of the water wheel.
    "1964," he recalls, "was the year my people had to leave our village to accommodate the waters of the Aswan High Dam. I returned in 1965 after my first album, Newport and the United Nations' Human Rights Day. I visited my people in their new places. I realised how changed they had become. When I came back to the United States I was sitting in my studio and trying to play the oud. I couldn't do anything but repeat one phrase, like, `I'm going to have lunch, I'm going to have lunch, I'm going to have lunch.' Which is the repetition of Escalay. No other music was coming out of me. Then somebody came from Los Angeles and suggested I record for his company. With him was a girlfriend of his. When she saw my paintings she said, `Oh my God! I have some slides that just look like those paintings.' I asked to see them and she took me to her house. She put some slides in the projector of the steamboat trip from Aswan to Wadi Halfa on the border of Sudan. Nubian villages are not [set out] in a circle. They hug the Nile. So, every single mountain or shore I see, I know where I am. I was so excited physically. She gave them to me with the projector. I went home. I had recorded that water wheel repetition even before I'd recorded Water Wheel. I played the tape, putting the slides in the projector and it was as if I was sitting on the water wheel with the music and seeing the world going around me. The world itself around me was turning while I was sitting facing one direction. There I realised the piece could be describing the water wheel."
    Eclipse, his album recorded by Hart, was an attempt to capture the essence of a tradition trickling into decline. If Nubian tradition is water, Eclipse is like the shaddouf, the pivoted poles which transfer water into irritation ditches. "The reason I call it Eclipse," explains Hamza, "is because it is a style of music that is disappearing. Like Oum Kalthoum's style of long songs, it doesn't exist anymore. Music is like a sandwich nowadays. Sandwiches don't make you full. But Oum Kalthoum was filling. My kind of music and the related hand-clapping is not used no more. After the Aswan High Dam my people started to get faster. They don't concentrate on the slow essence in their music. So, I called it Eclipse because this kind of music was disappearing."
    In 1981 he received an invitation to a Japanese seminar about the oud, lute and biwa. "I discovered Japan and its culture. I fell in love and decided to stay." Nowadays he flits between Japan and America but it was Japan which published his autobiography, Journey: As The Nile Flows (in Japanese). And it was the Japanese NHK channel which underwrote his Nubiana Suite (1990) describing "how to activate a water wheel".

    Later works such as Lily of the Nile (1990), Muwashshah (1995) and Available Sound - Darius (1996) capture other faces of the man and his music. Peppering these recordings are allusions to other, earlier compositions. Snatches of Escalay appear as musical quotations. Compositions are reprised. But this does not necessarily betoken a drying-up of inspiration. Returning to older pieces, as he put it to me for the Pieces of Africa booklet, reminds how "Everyone...will express himself according to his age..." Songs change over the passage of time and with greater experience and age, songs once young mature. How a musician reinterprets a song is a benchmark of maturity and insight. In that respect no-one compares to Hamza El Din in his tradition but, more importantly, in the work of Ali Hussan Kuban and Abdel Karim El Kabli there are the new shoots of a vigorous tradition.
    The Lily of the Nile is supposed to have slightly narcotic qualities. For over 30 years Hamza El Din has been concocting a heady music, quality guaranteed. In the process he has provided us with an insight into a culture, largely of his creation and curatorship. Few musicians have shaped aesthetic sensibilities so profoundly and few have inspired so many generations.
                  

11-18-2003, 09:45 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    وهذا حوار اجرته معه امازون دوت كوم:
    The Desert Oud of Hamza El Din

    Hamza El Din is considered by many to be the greatest living oud player today. Born in Nubia in the country of Sudan, El Din held a promising career as an engineer in Egypt before taking up the oud in the early 1960s. He began collecting folk songs regionally before studying music formally in Italy. In 1964 he made his American debut at the Newport Folk Festival and later lived for several years in San Francisco--creating beautiful desert music with his oud and finding friends in such artists as the Grateful Dead's Mickey Hart, Kronos Quartet cellist Joan Jeanrenaud, and pianist W.A. Mathieu. El Din's latest album, A Wish, offers lovely collaborations inspired by his home village of Troshka and the region of Nubia.
    -
    Amazon.com: With A Wish you've said you wanted to preserve the culture of your homeland through song. Do you feel you've fulfilled your wish with this album?

    Hamza El Din: I began my musical career wishing to preserve the Nubian culture. The experience of living in many different countries has, over time, broadened and changed my direction. As an artist I use music to express myself and compose songs not only for Nubia but also for my belief and all that I love and value. Of course, I think of my home like other people living away from their homeland, and so this new CD, A Wish, is dedicated to my old village. But I don't think that any one person's effort can preserve an entire culture.

    Amazon.com: At an earlier time in your life you traveled throughout Egypt on a donkey collecting Nubian songs. What was that experience like?

    El Din: It was a most interesting and educational time in my life. I was a kind of ethnomusicologist without knowing it. I began with the observation that a lullaby among us, sung by two women, mothers, possibly even sisters, sounds different even though the lyrics were the same. That observation opened the door for me to travel extensively all over Nubia in Egypt and Sudan to meet people and observe our culture in a kind of personal fieldwork. What I found was overwhelmingly informative with regard to our musical heritage, and what I gained was the indescribable joy of discovering a hidden treasure.

    Amazon.com: You've said that at a certain point you felt your oud had finally attained the Nubian accent. What is the Nubian accent of the oud?

    El Din: The oud music from the Middle East, Iran, Asia Minor, and the Balkans is all built on a system of tetrachords, groups of four consecutive notes common to different but related maqams, or musical scales. The music moves from one scale to another in the same composition, transitioning by means of shared tetrachords. However, the tonality of the oud music from different areas varies, and in my mind, my oud sounds like what I would call the "desert oud." It is like a piece of Bach's music, performed by German, French, Korean, and Egyptian cellists, each educated only in his own country, each with his own uniquely different accent.

    Amazon.com: You've lived in America for much of your adult life. Has any sort of Western music influenced your songwriting?

    El Din: I can't say that I have been influenced by Western music as a whole because of the difference of its tonality, structure, and philosophy from what I grew up with and learned with the oud, even though I studied Western music in Italy. However, some influences are no doubt present, like making harmony when I play with other musicians. And I enjoy listening to classical, jazz, and other music very much.

    Amazon.com: You played the Newport Folk Festival in 1964. What was that experience like for a young Nubian musician from Africa?

    El Din: Wow! I never saw such a large number of #########, counted by the tens of thousands, from the stage. Ordinarily, when I perform I close my eyes. In the middle of that performance, I felt that the audience must have either left or fallen asleep, they were so quiet, and so different from a Middle Eastern audience. But when I finished playing, applause erupted and I felt the warm appreciation for my art. I left the stage thanking God for my success and for showing me a new audience and how they listen to music. I saw many people working backstage, so many different types, reminding me that this is America, the country of diversity of people and culture. I felt America had such an extraordinary capacity to accept and appreciate other cultures, more than any other country.

    Amazon.com: How did your friendship with the Grateful Dead come about?

    El Din: Mickey Hart was the producer of my album, Eclipse, recorded in 1976, and through him I met the Grateful Dead family, the whole band, crew, and management. I found in them a quality of friendliness that made me encourage them to visit Egypt. We played in front of the Great Pyramid at Giza at the foot of the Sphinx in 1979 at the same time that Sadat and Begin were signing a peace agreement at Camp David. I have kept their friendship until now and they are all very warm whenever we meet. I still share the stage with Mickey on occasion.

    Amazon.com: Your song "Gala 2000" apologizes to the earth for mistreating it. How do you think we have mistreated the earth?

    El Din: For centuries we had been so engaged in technological development that we had forgotten to think about the earth we were exploiting. Maybe it is too late to get back the old beautiful earth despite our efforts. The song was written as an apology to the earth for this reason. I believe that the earth is not ours, we are just lent this earth from our ancestors for our future generations.
                  

11-18-2003, 10:29 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    ويكتب عنه جيسي هاملين في سان فرانسيسكو كورونيكل:
    Troubadour From Upper Nile Comes Home

    JESSE HAMLIN, Chronicle Staff Writer Friday, June 7, 1996


    Hamza's back in town. That would be Hamza El Din, the Nubian musician whose rich marriage of Arabic and Nubian sounds has mesmerized international audiences for three decades. After 14 years in Japan, the master of Middle Eastern music has moved back to Baghdad by the Bay.

    ``I was homesick for the U.S.,'' says El Din, who lived in the Bay Area for many years. ``Even if I go to Nubia, San Francisco feels like home.''

    A native of the ancient upper Nile land now divided between Egypt and the Sudan, El Din performs his hypnotic and quietly passionate music tonight, Saturday and Sunday at the Palace of Fine Arts for the opening of the 18th annual San Francisco Ethnic Dance Festival. The program, ``Hidden Treasure: Dance and Music Through the Islamic World,'' also features eight local dance troupes whose art is rooted in Islamic culture, including the Mevlevi Order of America (Turkish), Diamano Coura (West African) and Sri Susilowati (Indonesian).

    Din is a virtuoso player of the oud, the six-stringed Arabic precursor of the lute. He also sings, chantlike, in Arabic and Nubian, and plays the tar, the ancient drum depicted in hieroglyphics in the temples of the pharaohs.

    He has performed his original compositions -- Eastern sounds shaped in the forms of Western music -- with artists as varied as the Kronos Quartet and the Grateful Dead, and has scored and performed several film sound tracks (including Francis Coppola's ``Black Stallion'') and the music for director Peter Sellars' stage production of Aeschylus' ``The Persians'' at last year's Salzburg Festival.

    At the moment, he's busy making adjustments. ``I've had difficulty tuning my oud,'' says El Din, sitting in the bright Oakland apartment he moved into a month ago. ``The environment (here) has a different hum; the noise pollution is different. In Japan, the noise pollution is organized -- there are different times for various motor vehicles. Here it's a free-for- all any time of the day,'' he says, laughing.

    El Din, 65, has been practicing a tune he'll play tonight. Its title expresses his longtime sense of himself as a roving troubadour and citizen of the world: ``I Have No Address.''

    ``What is my nationality?'' asks El Din, a serenely joyous man whose speech is sprinkled with proverbs and lyrical phrases that sound like proverbs.

    ``Nubian-Egypto-Sudanese-Italo-American-Japanese. I've lived in all those places. I was a Nubian musician playing for my people; now I'm a Nubian musician playing those same themes for the whole world.''

    Much of his music is based on traditional Nubian songs and stories, but arranged in a new way for the oud, an instrument unknown in Nubia until he introduced it. In fact, the concept of performance itself was also unknown: For thousands of years, Nubian music meant communal singing and percussion, always serving a social function. Audiences didn't exist.

    ``Our music is the voice, the drum and hand clapping,'' says El Din, who began playing the oud while studying engineering at the University of Cairo in the late '50s.

    ``It's a group effort, singing for every occasion: births, deaths, weddings, planting, harvesting, circumcision, calling to someone long-distance down the river. It was unheard of to perform music. My people could not accept what I was doing.''

    But El Din was on a mission: Learning of the plan to build the Aswan High Dam, which would flood most of the land the Nubians had farmed for millennia, he set out to warn his people and preserve their culture before the land itself vanished. To do so, he created a style of music that was at once old and new.

    ``I tried to tell people that our whole 9,000-year history will disappear,'' El Din says, ``but they refused to listen. Then one old Nubian guy, a funny-looking man with a spiritual tic, told me, `Sing it.' ''

    El Din quit his engineering job with the Egyptian national railroad in Cairo and ``took the oud to Nubia.'' He traveled by donkey from village to village, collecting songs. His oud playing, still Arabic in style, didn't catch on until it absorbed the distinctively Nubian rhythm and sound.

    ``One day I felt the oud had the Nubian accent,'' El Din says. ``I played for people in my village and they were mesmerized. I knew I had something.''

    He studied Western music at the Academy of St. Cecilia in Rome on an Italian government grant, which opened his ear to harmony and taught him ``how to frame a composition, to give it shape and structure.''

    From Japanese classical musicians El Din learned ``precision and patience. What they can do with one note!''

    His playing, rich in overtones, is more relaxed, subtle and intricate than that of the typical oud virtuoso. ``The Egyptians say I sound like a Yemeni,'' El Din says. ``The Yemenis say I sound like a Moroccan, the Moroccans say I sound like a Syrian. Everybody relates me to something else. It means my music is me.''


                  

11-18-2003, 10:22 AM

البعيو

تاريخ التسجيل: 12-07-2002
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    دكتور عباس...اسعد الله صباحك...لك الشكر على القاء الضوء على مدرسة العود العازف الفذ الاستاذ حمزة علاء الدين فهو مدرسه وعالما من الترانيم المميزة التى تسحرك وتمتلكك وقد تعجز افصح الالسن واللغات ان تنطق مثلها فالتحيه للاستاذ الفنان حمزة علاء الدين والله يمتعه بالصحة والعافية...
    http://www.kairarecords.com/oudpage/other3.htm
                  

11-18-2003, 10:29 AM

ابو جهينة
<aابو جهينة
تاريخ التسجيل: 05-20-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 21601

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: البعيو)

    الدكتور عباس مصطفي
    لك التحية و التقدير
    كل سنة و إنت طيب و بعافية
    متعك الله بالعافية كما أمتعتنا بهذا السفر الهائل عن الموسوعة الموسيقية حمزة علاء الدين
    و أعجبتني كلمتك عن أن السودان لا يجيد تلميع موهوبيه و مبدعيه
    تشكر كثيرا مرة أخرى لهذه السياحة الثرة الغنية
    سلمت
                  

11-18-2003, 10:51 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: ابو جهينة)

    لك العافية ابو جهينة ,,
    ربما قرات , سمعت , شئيا عن ان الاذاعة السودانية اعتبرته فنان شعبي او شئ كهذا ولم يرض الوضع الرجل ,, قد توكن الرواية غير حقيقية ..
    على كل حال فتحنا بابا يليت الجميع يسهم في اضاءة جوانبه ,, اين صديقي فيصل محمد صالح ,, اين الموصلي ؟؟
    سعمت حمزة علاء الدين يعزف ويغني ,, واستمتعت كثيرا ,, ولكننا نود ان نراه بعين ناقدة ,,
                  

11-18-2003, 11:14 AM

ابو جهينة
<aابو جهينة
تاريخ التسجيل: 05-20-2003
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    عزيزي الدكتور عباس مصطفى
    فعلا أنا سمعت من أكثر من مصدر أن إذاعتنا الموقرة قد أجحفت في حق الرجل ،، و لكن الصحافة تناولته بين النقد و التحليل و أذكر أن معظم الذين كتبوا عنه عابوا عليه أنه و على وجه الخصوص بالسودان تناول بفنه الجانب النوبي فقط على حساب حصيلته و موهبته الموسيقية الواسعة ،، ربما إنطلاقا من هذاالحيز الضيق الذي حشر نفسه فيه كان رأى الإذاعة أنه فنان شعبي ،، و أخذت عليه أنه لم يقدم شيئا باللهجة العامية السودانية أو حتى بالفصحى كما فعل وردي عندما أتى لأول مرة و سجل أغنية باللهجة الدارجة ألحقها بعدها بأغاني نوبية
    الرجل عندما يغني بالنوبية ،، أعتبره هوميروس نوبي يقدم إلياذة كاملة ،، فأغانيه عبارة عن بانوراما حقيقية عن الحياة اليومية في قرى النوبة ،، يصاحبها عزف منفرد على العود ،، فيخيل إليك بأن أوركسترا كاملة تصحبه
    الرجل نوبي حتى النخاع ،، و في إعتقادي أنه أجحف في حق فنه و حق معجبيه ،، فهو يمتلك إمكانات أكبر مما قدم إلى الآن ،، و عقله مزدحم بعشرات الجماليات الموسيقية و لكنه مقل
    أرجو كما ذكرت أنت يا دكتور أن يساهم الإخوة الفنانين و الموسيقيين و يدلوا بدلوهم
    تسلم دكتور
                  

11-18-2003, 11:41 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: ابو جهينة)

    الرجل يابوجهينة لديه اكثر من ست البومات صدرت بين بداية الستينيات حتى نهاية التسعينيات ,, ربما يكون هذا حجم قليل بحساب الكم ولكنه يبدو لي مناسب كيفا ,,
    مشكلة اذاعة ام درمان من مشكلة الفهم المركزي ,, ترى لو جاء زكي عبد الكريم بغناء دنقلاوي كانوا اذاعوا له ؟ ,,لا اظن ,, من منا يعرف غناء اهل الجنوب بلغاتهم ؟؟ ربما فقط قليلون جدا من الباحثين ,,
    اظن ان في مقدور حمزة علاء الدين ان يغني بغير لغة النوبة وموسيقى النوبة ولكنه يريد المحافظة على تراث يخاف ان تجرفه البحيرة كما قال هو شخصيا ,,
                  

11-18-2003, 11:17 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: البعيو)

    اشكرك كثيرا على اهتمامك ,, من المهم جدا ان نبحث عن مبدعينا ,, هذا الرجل لا يعرفه الجيل الجديد ,, لم تنتقل موسيقاه عبر الاذاعة بما يكفي ويوازي شهرته في بلاد بعيدة ,,
    هو عيب فينا ..
                  

11-18-2003, 11:35 AM

haleem

تاريخ التسجيل: 09-10-2002
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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    عام 96 شاهدت برنامجا كاملا في الفضائية المصرية عنه..كفنان مصري جاب العالم ..والمثير أنه في نهاية البرنامج يكتب بخط يده وبعامية سودانية كلمات على ما أذكر ..أنا عايز أرجع بلدي..أو ما شابه
                  

11-18-2003, 02:14 PM

ترهاقا
<aترهاقا
تاريخ التسجيل: 07-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 7079

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: haleem)

    شكرا دكتور عباس على تسليط الضوء على هذا الموسيقار العظيم
    فهو صديق عظيم اعتز بصداقته كثيرا حيث تم التعارف بيننا عندماكان يقيم بمدينة أوكلاند بولاية كاليفورنيا فهو غنى عن التعريف ولكنه لم يكن يعرفنى قبل ذاك الوقت ،
    كنا نتحادث اكثر من مرة اسبوعيا دون ان يرى احدنا الاخر
    وذات يوم هاتفنى قائلا انه بصدد عمل ليلة موسيقية بمدينة سانتا مونيكاالتى لا تبعد عنى كثيرا، ووجه لى الدعوة وبالحروف ( على الاقل نتشاوف يا سكداوى ) ايعازا للمنطقة النوبية التى انتمى إليها
    فسعدت بهذه الدعوة وابلغتهه بانى ساكون بالجلباب السودانى حتى يتعرف على بين الحضور ، وقمت بدورى بدعوة الصديق العزيز الفنان عبداللطيف عبد الغنى (وردى الصغير ) ولا اريد ان يطلق عليه هذا الاسم لا لسبب وإنما لانه له أغانيه الخاصة ولكن إبتعاده عن مسرح الاحداث قد طمس كثيرا من إنتاجه ،
    توجهنا إلى مكان الحفل بمدينة سانتا مونيكا بيتش وكان الحفل قد بدا
    وإضطررنا للإنتظار حتى ينتهى من وصلته الموسيقية
    بعد ذلك دخلنا فى القاعة وذكرت لاحد منظمى الحفل أننا ضيوف للفنان
    حمزالدين علاءالدين وهذا هو الاسم الصحيح كما ذكر الدكتور عباس
    حيث علقت ايضا الصديقة أم الخير ذات يوم (يعنى من كترة دين الحلفاويين خاتى دينين فى إسمة ) وهى كانت تقيم فى نفس المدينة
    التى يقيم فيها حمزالدين .
    تجاذبنا اطراف الحديث وتحدث معى عن التعاون وإمكانية إدخال آلة الاورغ فى بعض أغانيه ولكن لم يسعفنا الوقت ، كان حديثا شيقا وهو إلى جانب فنه العظيم فهو خفيف الظل سريع النكتة والبديهة
    وفى نهاية الحفل لم يجد وقتا ليودعنا من كثرة المعجبين والمعجبات ليوقع لهم اتوقرافات حيث لم يكن فى الحفل غيرى وصديقى عبداللطيف من السودانيين وكنت أتعجب عندما يطلب هؤلاء المستمعين الذين لا ينطقون اللغة النوبية اغانى بعينها من الاستاذ حمزة باللغة النوبية والذى كان يبدأها بمحاضرة عن ماهية الاغنية وظروفها وعن ماذ تتحدث الاغنية بطريقة لبفة جدا شهدت له انذاك بأنه محاضر ومتحدث من الطراز الاول
    فى الختام شكرا عباس ولى عودة إنشاء الله لان الحديث يطول عن هذا العملاق.
                  

11-18-2003, 01:47 PM

الجندرية
<aالجندرية
تاريخ التسجيل: 10-02-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 9450

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    نحن جيل جنى عليه اعلامنا السوداني
    لم نعرف عن حمزة علاء الدين سوى بعض المقطوعات التي تبثها اذاعة امدرمان نادراً
    لكنها كانت كافية ليوشم ذاكرتنا ووجداننا بعزفه البديع
    شكراً ليك د . عباس وبانتظار المزيد عن عملاقنا
    وياريت يا اباولا تمبس ولا عمك تنقو تختو لينا حاجةهنا

    (عدل بواسطة الجندرية on 11-18-2003, 02:04 PM)

                  

11-18-2003, 01:56 PM

ابو جهينة
<aابو جهينة
تاريخ التسجيل: 05-20-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 21601

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: الجندرية)

    عزيزي دكتور عباس
    لقد فهمت ما ترمي إليه
    فعلا الإذاعة تعامل الفن و الموسيقى بمبدأ أن اللغة الرسمية هي اللغة العربية ،، أما باقي اللهجات فلا مكان لفنها بالإذاعة إلا أحيانا في برنامج في ربوع السودان
    لم يجعلوا الإذاعة البوتقة التي تنصهر فيها كل الفنون بمختلف اللهجات ،، حصروها في اللغة العربية رغم هذا الزخم من الفنون باللهجات من الجنوب و الغرب و الشرق و الشمال الذي يملأ ساحة الفن السوداني
    ربما الآن قد بدأوا في نوع من كسر هذه القاعدة مع إرهاصات السلام الآتي و هو أيضا لا يرقى تمثيلا لكمية الفن الكامن في القبائل بلهجاتها
    الفن لغة عالمية ،، و الدليل أن البعض في السودان مثلا يمتلك مكتبة من الأغاني الهندية و الحبشية و هو لا يعرف كلمة من هاتين اللغتين
    يا ترى ؟ كم فنان لا يعرف اللغة العربية بالسودان ضاع وسط هذا الزحام ؟
                  

11-18-2003, 02:14 PM

kofi


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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    الذين يخرجون لنا الدرر الكامنة يستحقون الشكر مثلك ولربما عصى على الناس استيعاب هذا الرقم السودانى الكبير جدا,,
    الموسيقار حمزة علاءالدين من (اشكيت) وهى قرية فى اعماق التراب السودانى ولكنة امتداد نوبى حقيقى وفى هذا يشترك المصريون اما من حيث التقسيم الجغرافى فلا علاقة لة بمصر وهو يحمل الجنسية السودانية وبالميلاد,,
    حمزة تم تعيينة مستشارا بوزارة الاعلام السودانية ومسئولا عن فرقة الفنون الشعبية ويذكرة الكثيرون منكبا على عملة متحزما بقميصة ,,
    وقد ترك الوزارة وغادر متاففا من (المماحكات) والحاجات الكثيرة التى يعفها الاكرمون ابناء الحضارات السعيدة ومضى الى عالمة الكبير واثقا من امكاناتة وامكانياتة التى اوصلتة الى جوائز متفردة من اليونسكو وجامعة طوكيو,,
    حمزة علاء الدين يغنى الموشحات الاندلسية كعالم متخصص فى الموسيقى الشرقية واعتقد ان (مغتربى) البلاد البعيدة يمكنهم الحصول على البوم eclipse ,وهو متوفر منذ السبعينات,,
    حمزة مرجع اكاديمى بلغ العالمية بقدراتة واستيعابة المبكر للموسيقى واستفادتة من نشاتة فى مصر بالدراسة المتخصصة ومن بعض (عباقرة) زمانهم فى العود وهو عاشق لة وماهر على (الدف)
    حمزة مفخرة لكل سودانى اصيل (وتهبشة ) ايقاعاتة الساحرة
    شكرا للبوست الجميل
                  

11-18-2003, 02:36 PM

Optimist


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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: kofi)

    نشكر الدكتور عباس مصطفي لهذا البوست

    للأ خ /كوفي
    حمزة علاء الدين ليس من أشكيت كما إدعيت بل هو من النوبة المصرية ومن قرية توشكي تحديداًً ( توشكا) إلا أن ميوله سودانية وللمزيد عن حمزه هذا العملاق يكمنكم عمل بحث في الياهو بإدخال الإسم هكذا HAMZA EL DIN
                  

11-18-2003, 02:58 PM

aba
<aaba
تاريخ التسجيل: 03-06-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 1993

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    تشكر كتير يا دكتور عباس


    الأستاذ المبدع حمزة علاء الدين


    (عندما يعزف حمزة يسيل النيل من عوده)
    بانقا الياس

    قدم كل حصيلة تسجيلاته في اليابان لصالح المنكوبين في السودان

    يرفض التخلي عن الزي التقليدي السوداني في كل المحافل والمناسبات التي يشارك بها

    نجح في تطويع آلة العود لتخدم قضيته الأصلية(الثقافة النوبية) علميا بإضافة وتر سادس لآلة العود

    كتب حمزة الموسيقي التصويرية للعديد من الأفلام والمسرحيات
    العربية والأجنبية

    (عدل بواسطة aba on 11-18-2003, 03:18 PM)
    (عدل بواسطة aba on 11-18-2003, 04:34 PM)

                  

11-18-2003, 03:30 PM

Elmosley
<aElmosley
تاريخ التسجيل: 03-14-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 34683

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    عزيزي دكتور عباس مصطفي
    حمزه علاء الدين مبدع ولاشك كما انه استطاع ان يوصل فنه الي العالم وهذا ايضا يشكر عليه
    وهو انسان قمه في التواضع وقد التقينا كثيرا بالقاهرة وسان فرانسسكو بكاليفورنيا وكان بيني وبينه مره مشروع تسجيل مشترك بالقاهرة الا انه لم يتم
    ارفع قبعتي تحية له
    بقي ان نعرف ان كثيرين يخلطون بينه وبين موسيقارنا الكبير الراحل
    علاء الدين حمزه والذي اودع كنوزا ودررا بمكتبة الاذاعة السودانية وقاد اوركسترا الاذاعة ردحا من الزمن عليه الرحمة
    Quote: وامد الله في عمر حمزه علاء الدين

    (عدل بواسطة Elmosley on 11-18-2003, 03:31 PM)

                  

11-18-2003, 03:38 PM

bushra suleiman
<abushra suleiman
تاريخ التسجيل: 05-27-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 2627

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    الفنان البروفسير حمزه نوبى اصيل وكانت لى معه صولات وجولات وقد تبادلنا رسائل كثيرة احتفظ بها كذكرى عزيزه،وقد اجريت معه لقاءا صحفيا نشر بجريدة الشرق الاوسط عام1992 تحدث فيه عن تجربته الفنية فى اليابان وعمله بوزارة الثقافة فى السودن فترة حكم النميرى،ومسائل اخرى وارجو ان انشرها كاملة للتعريف بهذا العبقرى الذى غزا اليابان وامريكا بعوده
                  

11-18-2003, 03:47 PM

aba
<aaba
تاريخ التسجيل: 03-06-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 1993

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: bushra suleiman)







    مجموعة صور لألبومات موسيقية للأستاذ حمزة علاء الدين
    أو حمزة الدين كما يسميه الغربيون

    مع الشكر للأخ Optimist للويب سايت

    (عدل بواسطة aba on 11-18-2003, 03:50 PM)

                  

11-18-2003, 04:42 PM

aba
<aaba
تاريخ التسجيل: 03-06-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 1993

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: aba)


    رحلة


    توشكا

    جرافيك

    حمزة علاء الدين تشكيلي بالإضافة لكونه موسيقي
    وهذه بعض لوحاته
                  

11-18-2003, 07:22 PM

Agab Alfaya
<aAgab Alfaya
تاريخ التسجيل: 02-11-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 5015

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    Quote: الموسيقار حمزة علاءالدين من (اشكيت) وهى قرية فى اعماق التراب السودانى ولكنة امتداد نوبى حقيقى وفى هذا يشترك المصريون اما من حيث التقسيم الجغرافى فلا علاقة لة بمصر وهو يحمل الجنسية السودانية وبالميلاد,,
    حمزة تم تعيينة مستشارا بوزارة الاعلام السودانية ومسئولا عن فرقة الفنون الشعبية ويذكرة الكثيرون منكبا على عملة متحزما بقميصة ,,

    الاخ الدكتور عباس مصطفي
    والله عاجزون عن الشكر علي القاء الضوء علي هذا الكنز
    واسف علي ان الزيارة جات متاخرة شوية لانشغالي الشديد
    كما اشكر كل الاخوان المشاركين الذين ساهموا في تعريفنا بهذا
    الكنز واخص بالذكرالاخ كوفي الذي اقتبست منه هذه المعلومة القيمة
    وكم حز في نفسي ان علما بهذه الاهمية مهمل و غير معروف في بلده
    لدرجة ان يدعيه اخرون لتكبير الكوم ونحن نتفرج!
    يا سبحان الله !يا اخي دي امة عجيبة جدا.لا يعجبها العجب
    ولا الصيام في كل ايام السنة!
    ارجو ن الاستاذ الموصلي تسليط مزيد من الضوء علي الموسيقار والملحن
    الاخر علاء الدين حمزة الذي يشبه اسمه اسم حمزة علاء الدين النوبي
                  

11-18-2003, 08:21 PM

Optimist


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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Agab Alfaya)

    الأخ / عجب الفيا


    الأستاذ حمزة علاء الدين من مواليد قرية توشكي في النوبة المصريةوإخوانه الآن مقيمون في مصر في قرية من قري النوبة بعد أن غرقت قرية توشكا عند بناء السد هاجر إلى السودان في الخمسينات واقام في وادي ردحاً من الزمان

    شاهدته في التلفزيون المصري في عام 96 عندما افتتح الرئيس حسني مبارك متحف الٌأقصر وكان احد المغنين في حفل الإفتتاح وقدم في الحفل على أنه مصري حيث قدم رأئعته (Escaly) (water wheel)كذلك هناك فيلم وثائقي عنه في Nile Tv ,وتم عمل لقاء مع أهله في النوبة المصرية في ذلك الفيلم
                  

11-18-2003, 08:23 PM

Optimist


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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Optimist)

    عفوا

    واقام في وادي حلفا
                  

11-19-2003, 07:37 AM

Agab Alfaya
<aAgab Alfaya
تاريخ التسجيل: 02-11-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 5015

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    شكرا يا اخ اوبتمبست
    علي هذه المعلومات والنوبة كلهم اهل
                  

11-19-2003, 08:04 AM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Agab Alfaya)

    حمزة علاء الدين له بريد الكتروني ,, لعلنا نفتح معه نافذة للحوار ان قبل هو [email protected]
    اعتقد انه من الضروري ان يجمع المنبر ما امكن من المعلومات حول الرجل ,, لمحاولة اسهام حول عبقرية سودانية مجهولة بالنسبة للاجيال الحاضرة .
                  

11-19-2003, 02:38 PM

sari_alail
<asari_alail
تاريخ التسجيل: 10-19-2002
مجموع المشاركات: 1507

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    UP
                  

11-20-2003, 06:57 PM

Dr.Abbas Mustafa

تاريخ التسجيل: 10-04-2003
مجموع المشاركات: 229

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20 عاما من العطاء و الصمود
Re: سودانيون : حمزة علاء الدين (Re: Dr.Abbas Mustafa)

    هل نقول // من جملة ما كتب من تعليقات عن حمزة علاء الدين ,, انه مهما كانت من محاولات على مدى عقود سنوات حكومات السودان الوطنية لعزل ناس هذا البلد عن ثقافتهم ,, من نسيج تفاصيل ايامهم الخاصة ,, الا انها كانت دائما محاولات خاسرة
    حمزة علاء الدين رماه السودان بعيدا ولكنه اخذ ذرات من رمله و حصاه معه في هذا البعيد ,,
    تحية لكل من حاشى
                  


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